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Saturday, October 18, 2014

The Ebola Crisis


The Ebola Crisis
A Cranky Opinion for

CRANKY OPINION SATURDAY

The following opinion is from a cranky old man with virtually no knowledge on the subject opined.  Opposing opinions are welcome, but they will probably be ignored, and as always, please, no name calling…that means you, you big stupid head!

The news these days is all about Ebola.  How to stop it?  What should we do?  Has the CDC dropped the ball?  Should we be halting all traffic from Africa?  I don’t know who has or who has not dropped the ball.  I don’t know if we are being told all the correct information about this virus or not. 

They say you can only get the virus if you are in contact with infected body fluids.  One knowledgeable blogger I read says it may well be morphing into a virus that can be spread through the air.  I hope not.

The one thing I have taken note of in this crisis is the doctors who do not run from the stricken, the nurses who go about their job when infection is so easily caught.  Many medical people are running to infected areas, not from them.

These people are heroes, and it seems no one is recognizing it.  In fact some are demonized for going to help and then returning to possibly infect others in this country. 

I suppose we could try and isolate everyone from areas where the virus has broken out.  I suppose we could just assume it is not our problem and let the virus run its course wiping out much of a continent.

Those brave doctors and nurses who suit up in hazmat suits to try and save the stricken don’t feel that way.  They choose to risk their lives to bring relief to the sick, to maybe learn how to treat the disease, to save lives, to find a vaccine that will make all of us safe from the deadly virus.

While we all worry about mistakes made to limit the spread of the virus, while we once again attempt to turn a disaster or a possible pandemic into a political football, maybe we could at least offer up some appreciation, respect, and good will towards the heroes who are risking their lives to save others and to find a way to stop further infections.

I believe that our scientists will develop a vaccine for Ebola.  I believe our medical facilities will heal the stricken at a better rate than in Africa.  When the pressure is on and no one puts up roadblocks, this country finds a way to solve big problems. 

I fear that while our best people go about solving this problem, doctors and nurses will be lost.  I hope their bravery and sacrifice is not taken lightly.

The preceding was the opinion of a cranky old man and not necessarily that of management…Mrs. Cranky.    

26 comments:

  1. I've worked in many job settings including a hospital. Out of all of the employees I've encountered, the nurses look like they lead the hardest lives.

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  2. Very well said.
    The U.S. isn't perfect (no country is); however, we are smart nation and a generous nation. Like the brave volunteers in the military who protect us as best they can, so do our medical professionals and volunteers who risk their lives during this Ebola episode. Let's hope and pray that it is a short one and that those who get infected will survive it.

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  3. Well said and I could not have written it better! Thank you!

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  4. I believe the people in this country most in danger are medical personnel and the rest of the country needs to cut the fear mongering. What's happened to the Pennsylvania shooter? Our attention span is too short.

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  5. Here's where we can donate: http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/
    There are a lot of other NGO's that do help, but Doctors Without Borders are boots on the ground while other's are debating about what to do.

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  6. Well said Joe - they deserve our respect, our thoughts and our thanks for taking such a huge risk to bring comfort and aid to those in need and, in some cases, paying the ultimate price.

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  7. Yep, and let's throw the cops into this mix. They are vilified for doing jobs that very few would do. The mentality of folks right now makes me shake my head. These health care workers are saints in my book.

    Have a terrific day Cranky. Hello to Mrs. Cranky. ☺

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  8. You are so right about those doctors and nurses being heroes. It staggers me that some people actually complain about them going to Africa "in case they bring ebola back to this country". What selfish minds those people must have.

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  9. Yes, doctors and nurses are a rare breed. Well said.

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  10. Well said. You can be sure that many countries are working on a vaccine. Your friends north of the border included. http://www.torontosun.com/2014/10/18/canada-to-ship-ebola-vaccine-to-world-health-organization-monday

    Here's to the many brave healers in our world.

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  11. Completely agree with you! I have to say that I did find it interesting with the nurse that got Ebola here from that patient, its interesting it was 2 nurses, no doctors or other medical personnel that would have been involved, i.e., lab draws, x-ray technicians, etc. Perhaps investigating that aspect may help figure out how it is transmitted. I tell you, though, the name Ebola does put a fear in you just a bit when a college campus 3 miles from where you live and across the street where hubby teaches guitar, a section of it is quarantined the other day when a student told an instructor she was on the same plane as the nurse with Ebola. Just hearing that it could be in your neck of the woods caused just a moment of panic As it turned out, the student made the whole thing up and more than likely might have some charges filed against her. A friend's daughter was one that was quarantined; she said what a surreal experience it was.

    I do hope the cure is found sooner than later for it.

    betty

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  12. Amen brother. I totally agree and also wonder about those special souls that don't think about self but just do. Wow.

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  13. Amen, brother. I read about a local nurse who is taking her husband and young daughter with her as she moves back to Africa to work with Ebola patients and their families. I admit I questioned putting her child in harm's way, but she spent time there as a child and feels confident her family will be fine. I so hope they stay well.

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  14. Well said, Cranky. And it's worth remembering that over four thousand Americans die from the common flu every year and we have cures for influenza.

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  15. Yeah, and we're wasting all our energy fighting over how to stop something that, so far, has hit no more than 3 people country-wide instead of pulling together and focusing on a solution that could benefit the world. Shame on us for panic instead of action, eh?

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  16. I don't understand the panic either. Yes, we have to be careful and vigilant, but we shouldn't use Ebola as a political argument. How many people have died in the U.S. from Ebola? One. How many die from the flu each year? About 20,000 to 40,000. Where is the panic?

    And what I want to know: how come the wife of the Liberian man who died from it did not get infected? She shared a bed with him and hugged him and consoled him because he was sick and had a high fever.

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  17. Kudos to the nurses and doctors.

    I can't get all worked up about Ebola. Remember when we were all going to die of the swine flu epidemic back in '09? Turned out its mortality rate was less than that of the regular flu. Before that it was SARS. I wonder about these sensational news stories that get pushed to the forefront for weeks at a time. It's almost like we are expected to panic.

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  18. It's a scary disease, but then most things are when they have the potential to become epidemic. I think that with care and safety measures most of us will be safe and like you, I am grateful to the nurses and doctors who are going over there to help and possibly find ways to stop it spreading.

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  19. To Cranky Old Man: Hear! Hear!

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  20. Amen and amen. May they be kept safe as they try to help.

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  21. Amen. "60 Minutes" on Sunday interviewed several nurses from the Dallas hospital where the first Ebola patient died. Not a one had hesitated to give him their best. They are the front lines in this epidemic and deserve our respect. Thank you for this--and congratulations on your POTW from Hilary.

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  22. My senior year of high school I also attended a local vo-tech school and took the nursing assistant class. In the mid 80's I went to work at a local nursing home for ten years. I loved working there even after an alzheimers patient broke my wrist and I had to have surgery and was unable to return to that type of work. The down fall was all the stuff we were exposed to like German Measles when I was pregnant. The many bottles of Kwell because of scabies exposures but the biggy was when we were all exposed to TB. :/ Yep that one was the kicker!!! The wait to see if I reacted, If I did have a reaction meant my entire family was possibly exposed. My youngest baby was only 8 months old. Yep can't imagine Ebola!!!

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